How do you write a lab discussion?

How do you write a lab discussion?

You might want to talk about how your results agree, or disagree, with the results from similar studies. Here you can also mention areas ways you could have improved your study or further research to be done on the topic. Do not just restate your results – talk about why they are significant and important.

How long should a biology lab report be?

Introduction of Your Lab Report It could be anywhere from three or four paragraphs to a couple pages long, depending on the complexity of the topic and, of course, the requirements of your instructor.

How do you conclude a biology lab report?

Method 1 of 5: Outlining your Conclusion

  1. Restate: Restate the lab experiment. Describe the assignment.
  2. Explain: Explain the purpose of the lab.
  3. Results: Explain your results.
  4. Uncertainties: Account for uncertainties and errors.
  5. New: Discuss new questions or discoveries that emerged from the experiment.

How do you write a biology experiment?

  1. States the purpose or objective of the experiment.
  2. The AIM usually starts with: ‘To investigate…’, ‘To demonstrate…’, To test…’, etc.
  3. The AIM should be kept in sharp focus throughout the experiment and write-up – including when writing the CONCLUSION. The CONCLUSION must answer the AIM.

What do you write in the discussion of a report?

What To Do When Writing A Scientific Discussion

  1. Do Summarize Your Results and Outline Their Interpretation in Light of the Known Literature.
  2. Do Explain the Importance of Your Results.
  3. Do Acknowledge the Shortcomings of the Study.
  4. Do Discuss Any Future Directions.
  5. Don’t Reiterate Your Results.

How do you write a discussion for a biology lab report?

The discussion section should definitely have a statement of your expected findings (Pechenik, 86). This should include your hypothesis and a brief statement about why these types of results are expected. There should also be a comparison of how your actual results related to your expected findings (Pechenik, 86).